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Contained within 425 square feet, this micro-loft in Manhattan is made of several layers of space, tucking in and out of the walls as needed. The deceiving interior design allows for plenty of storage while leaving the apartment as spacious as possible.

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This penthouse chalet in the Swiss Alps, designed by Heinz Julen, is basically one gigantic, sprawling attic, which is amazing. The warm and simple wooden interior provides some balance to the ridiculously luxurious layout. The penthouse is available for rent, if you're up to the trip.

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Tuesday, 16 April 2013 04:00

The Coolest Treehouse Ever

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Steve and Jeri Wakefield, the coolest grandparents ever, enlisted the help of family friend and architect James Curvan to design a detailed treehouse for their grandchildren. The castle in the sky is equipped with electricity, air conditioning, and ventilation, but that's much less interesting than everything else inside. The thoughtfully furnished interior will make you yearn for your childhood, and your own reading nook.

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Before it was turned into a hotel in WWII, Astley Castle was a fortified manor belonging to the royal family. It was eventually abandoned and left to fade into its surroundings, but it has since been renovated by Witherford Watson Mann Architects. The restored and modern version stays fairly true to the original construction because, you know, a castle is still a castle.

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Saturday, 13 April 2013 11:50

Chapeau Light for Flos by Philippe Starck

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Designed by Philippe Starck, the Chapeau Light for Flos is a clever table lamp which allows you to use anything as a lampshade to diffuse the LED array. Starck might prefer a hat, but why stop there? I see lots of possibilities here for customization and garage sale hunting.

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Saturday, 13 April 2013 11:30

Sky Art by Thomas Lamadieu

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At first glance, I looked at these illustrations by Thomas Lamadieu and thought, "How does someone draw in the sky? Is he a wizard?" It turns out, the artist first takes photographs of the sky and fills them in later, which is less wizardly, but still pretty cool.

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Is there anything Legos can't do? As a diehard fan of them since childhood, I'm pretty sure the answer is no. And now, someone has made the everyman's (everykid's?) classic toy and indicator of future architectural genius, into an elegant chandelier. Tobias Tostesen, designer of this beautiful light fixture, knows how much more interesting Lego bricks are than some fussy pieces of crystal. You're moving up in the world, Lego. 

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When you're ready to retire, you're probably going to want something like this beautiful and remote farmhouse, cozily nestled into the hillside as if it were born as part the landscape itself. It's located in New Zealand, on the hills between Muriwai and Bethells beaches, and it looks like you'll have to make friends with the local sheep who have claimed the grassy hills to themselves. Inside the farmhouse, a sleek and modern living space, complete with a pool, makes sure you won't miss the comforts of the city. 

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Mrs James Ward Thorne: Dining Room 1770-1774 Hammond-Harwood House, Annapolis, Maryland

Narcissa Ward Thorne, better known as Mrs. James Ward, was an incredibly talented sculptor of miniatures, as you can see in this incredible architectural collection, completed in the 1920s and 30s. Thorne's interiors ranged from opulent homes of the early American South, to elaborate English and French drawing rooms, to decadent parlors of New York City brownstones. The collection is now on display in her hometown of Chicago, at the Art Institute. 

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Andrew Myers might be the most patient person on the planet. The dedicated artist drilled 6,500 scews into a panel to bring forth this button-down shirt, drilling to different depths by instinct, to create the 3D effect. You may have seen Andrew's work before, in an incredible series of portraits composed of screws. Myers is also an accomplished sculptor and painter, because of course he is. 

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