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As Korean company Moneual are set to announce more details about their touchscreen table for cafes at the CES technology conference this year, we take a look through all the large touchscreen surfaces that have been appearing in the tech world over the last several years.

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The MoJo iCuisine is a restaurant in Taipei, Taiwan where the menus are projected onto touchscreen tables beneath. Customers can swipe through selections, make and pay for orders, and play interactive games during the wait. This 21st century dining experience means no interaction with awkward waiters and less small-talk with the friends who invited you to dinner. Let's just hope the power doesn't go out.

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Italian firm Toncelli have created "Prisma" a touchscreen surface for cooking at home. The company was founded in 1961 and has kept up with modern technology to expand their business from kitchen supplies and furniture to touchscreen tables which you can use to gaze at shaggy Italian men while you cook.

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The Miele multi-touch kitchen was designed by Fiona McAndrew and Conor Fallon. It utilizes technology to contain built-in functionality such as scales, cooktops and even a bluetooth connection for making shopping lists. Truly the kitchen of the future.

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The Electrolux mobile kitchen is a laptop-based design using four tier induction to heat your food as your browse the internet for recipes. It can also be used as a cutting board, which must feel very odd at first. Good for a tiny studio or single person.

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Portugese company Displax aren't into tables or kitchen countertops. They're creating touchscreen everything, made possible with a thin layer of film that can turn any surface touchscreen-compatible. The films are 98% transparent and they claim it can be stuck onto glass, plastic or wood. Despite having just explained it, I have no idea how this works.

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And finally, researchers at Intel are also trying to create touchscreens out of anything. "There's nothing absolutely special about the surface, and it doesn't matter if your hands are dirty," says Beverly Harrison, a senior scientist at Intel. "Our algorithm and a camera set-up can create virtual islands everywhere."

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You might also be interested in our article about the iPhone-controlled coffee-maker by Scanomat.

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